skip navigation

12U - PEE WEE SNOWBELT (HOUSE) News

Declaration of Player Safety, Fair Play and Respect

By USA Hockey Repost 11/13/2019, 10:30pm EST

Notification of Emphasis for the 2019-20 Season

USA Hockey is committed to creating a safe and fair environment for all participants. Respect for the game, opponents, coaches, and officials is a critical part of that environment and it covers several different aspects of sportsmanship and fair play. This Declaration of Safety, Fair Play and Respect will guide a change in culture as to what is considered to be acceptable/unacceptable body checking and competitive contact at all levels of play.

The Declaration clarifies and updates existing rules/definitions to emphasize the key points to more clearly outline what is deemed acceptable and unacceptable behavior. Below are videos that show examples of actions deemed "acceptable" and "unacceptable" to help illustrate expected behavior.

What is the Declaration of Safety, Fair Play and Respect?

When the USA Hockey Board of Directors ratified the Declaration of Safety, Fair Play and Respect in June of 2019 its intent was to create a culture that eliminates: 1) hits to the head, 2) hits from behind and 3) late hits.

The onus on modifying the culture lies with everyone in the game, from players, coaches and officials to media, parents, fans and administrators.

While the focus of the Declaration is largely around changing the culture and mindset involved with body checking, there is also language that deals with unsportsmanlike conduct centered around banging on the boards to celebrate a body check. Below, there is a video of Pat Kelleher, executive director of USA Hockey, commenting on the Declaration as well as a document that clarifies the intent around what has been a long-standing part of the USA Hockey rulebook. 

Also, in regard to body checking, the videos (on the site) share examples of acceptable and unacceptable body checking to help educate all involved in the sport as to the intent of the Declaration, which is focused on player safety and moving our sport forward.

It should be noted that USA Hockey supports legal body contact and body checking. The culture shift is an on-going effort to eliminate 1) hits from behind, 2) late hits and 3) hits to the head by more clearly defining body checking .

It is recognized that this is an effort that will take time and focus that in the end will make the game better for all involved.

For all information from this post visit the Declaration site on USA Hockey at https://www.usahockey.com/declaration

Required reading for all CSYHA participants regarding use of racial/derogatory slurs

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – USA Hockey announced today a presidential directive that changes the penalty for racial/derogatory slurs of any kind that fall under Rule 601 (e. 3) from a game misconduct to a match penalty.

“We continue to get reports of disturbing incidents of racial and other derogatory slurs, behavior which is reprehensible and has absolutely no place in our game, especially around our children,” said Jim Smith, president of USA Hockey. “For reasons I cannot explain or understand, the current penalty in place does not seem to be enough of a deterrent to stop this type of conduct.”

Smith noted that while modifying the severity of the penalty is an important step, it’s also vital that parents and coaches take the time to address the topic with athletes.

Effectively immediately, anyone penalized under Rule 601 (e.3) will receive a match penalty, which carries a five-minute penalty, disqualification from that game, and suspension from further participation until such time the governing Affiliate or junior league has conducted a hearing to review the matter. Affiliates or junior leagues have up to 30 days to investigate and conduct a hearing and the offending individual(s) is subject to further discipline.

Pat Kelleher, executive director of USA Hockey, noted the importance of all stakeholders working together for the betterment of the sport.

“The use of hateful language is a hurdle to creating a welcoming environment for families that want to be involved in our sport. Eradicating this kind of behavior from our game is critical as we continue to make a positive impact on society through hockey.”

|

To see more news items visit the CSYHA News Page