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      My son and his hockey teammates celebrate a goal.

      My Son Is Not 'Just' A House Hockey Player

      By By Caurie Putnam, Contributor Reprint from Life Parents Online 03/13/2019, 12:45pm EDT

      If I had one wish for my hockey player, it would be that he continues to always love the game.

      It happened again last night. My family was out to dinner and the waitress noticed my son’s Bauer hockey jacket with his youth hockey program patch on it.

      “What level hockey do you play?” she asked.

      “Bantam house,” he said.

      And then she said the words we have become so accustomed to hearing in this hockey-loving city we call home: “Oh, just house? My son played travel.”

      Yes, my son plays “just house.”

      House hockey is the lowest level of youth hockey a kid can play. It’s traditionally less competitive, cheaper and less demanding (schedule wise) than its big, more popular, brother “travel hockey.”

      Many kids start out playing “house” and then transition to travel, but some do not. Yes, there are those who never leave the house level because their skills never develop enough for travel play, but that’s not usually the case.

      Most of the families we’ve met during my son’s nine years of house hockey are there by choice. Their sons and daughters are “good enough” for travel, but travel isn’t the right fit for their family.

      “From passion to commitment, there is nothing “just” about him or any of his house hockey coaches or teammates.”

      For some families, travel hockey is not an option financially (travel hockey is significantly more expensive - often by one or two thousand dollars). For other families, parent work schedules make travel hockey’s intense practice, game and out-of-town (sometimes even out-of-country) tournament schedules impossible.

      And for other families, like mine, having another child with special needs means the best we can give our hockey player - from a time and commitment standpoint - is house.

      For our family, the demands of house hockey (practice at least two nights a week and games on the weekends) is even too much at times, but we make it work because hockey is our son’s passion.

      Yes, hockey is our house player’s passion.

      From passion to commitment, there is nothing “just” about him or any of his house hockey coaches or teammates.

      These kids love hockey just as much as the travel kids in their leagues. In some cases, I would venture to say they love it even more. My son is regularly mocked and told he “sucks” by a travel hockey player at his middle school for playing “just house,” but he doesn’t care. His love for the game overcomes all.

      My son has house hockey teammates who, without a doubt, are good enough to make their high school’s varsity teams. Will they ever make the NHL coming from a house level? Odds are no, but so are the odds for a travel player.

      My fellow hockey parents at the house level sit in the same rinks as the travel hockey parents.

      We can tell you the coldest rinks in the region, where every Tim Horton’s in an hour radius is located and tie skates with our eyes closed.

      Our SUVs also smell like a locker room and we have just as much pride in our sons and daughters when they’re named MVP of a game as travel parents do. Like travel hockey families, hockey is a huge part of our lives and our teams become our extended families and best friends too.

      The coaches who coach house hockey are just as committed to their players and the game as travel coaches.

      They must re-arrange work schedules to make their hockey schedules work, spend their precious downtime writing drills and reviewing tape, and handle the same issues in a locker room that travel coaches do (yes, house kids get angry or sullen when they don’t perform at their best level too).

      Teenage house hockey players have the same crazy hormones teenage travel hockey players have, and those hormones belong to the coach many hours a week.

      If I had one wish for my hockey player when he grows up, it would be that he always continues to always love the game.

      I hope he always remembers his years at the rink with fondness and pride and that if anyone ever asks him if he played travel or house as a kid he replies: “I played hockey.”

      8U Q-and-A: Transitioning from 8U to 10U

      By By Joe Bonnett, reprint from USA Hockey ADM Online 03/13/2019, 12:45pm EDT

      Original Source Link

      Q. My child is finishing their 8U half-ice season and headed to 10U hockey in the fall.  How will the transition to full ice go? 

      A. This is a great question. There is no doubt that there will be an adjustment period for your child.  It will be important to stay patient and try to understand the changes that your player will be experiencing.

      First of all, hopefully your child will continue to participate in an ADM program that offers age- appropriate training to your players. Some of these 10U ADM recommendations may be proper off-ice training, station-based practices and small team sizes.  This is important because you want to continue to build on the development that your child received while in the 8U program. 

      The initial transition to station-based practices and small-area games at 10U will be seamless. However, full-ice games will take some adjustment time for your child. Patience on your end will be required.  Do not worry about line changes and ‘off-sides.’ The players will pick this up quickly as the season progresses. Initially players may tend to group together and not spread out. This makes sense because so far you player has been encouraged to be around the puck and support the puck during their half-ice experience. Over time, and with good coaching, the players will learn to spread out, play position and use the new space of the ice.

      More importantly, as your 10U player trains in station-based practice and small areas, they will acquire skill and hockey IQ at a greater rate than their counterparts who do not train with ADM recommendations. As your child progresses through 10U you will see their comfort continue to increase in handling the puck, skating with the puck, playing in traffic, passing and competing. These skills will outweigh your opponents in time and lead to success on the full-ice sheet. 

      In the end, be ready for awesome growth of your player and be patient on the adjustment to the full-ice sheet. 

      MITE Hockey 101: Part 2

      For those that missed MITE Hockey 101 part 1 earlier this year here is the link and sums up what it is like to play mite hockey (https://youtu.be/cXhxNq59pWg)

       

      MITE Hockey 101 Part 2 gets even better:

       

      This Dad Put a Mic on His 4-Year-Old at Hockey Practice, and It Is Outrageously Cute

       

      February 25, 2019

      by KARENNA MEREDITH First Published: February 23, 2019

      Ever wonder what your kid is thinking when they're muttering to themselves in the middle of a sports game? Sure, you get to hear their thoughts almost every second of each day, but what are they saying when you're not listening? Well, Twitter user @howtohockey, or "Coach Jeremy," got the inside scoop by putting a mic on his 4-year-old son Mason at hockey practice. Turns out, little kids just want McDonald's, to play with their friends, and to take some breaks. Same, Mason, same.

      Watch the full video above, and chuckle along with every adorable Mason quote. My personal favorite? "I'm gonna have a nap!"

      The video can be found here (https://youtu.be/A3-L3YwU-iQ) and is also at our organization home page.  Enjoy!

       

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      My son and his hockey teammates celebrate a goal.

      My Son Is Not 'Just' A House Hockey Player

      By By Caurie Putnam, Contributor Reprint from Life Parents Online 03/13/2019, 12:45pm EDT

      If I had one wish for my hockey player, it would be that he continues to always love the game.

      It happened again last night. My family was out to dinner and the waitress noticed my son’s Bauer hockey jacket with his youth hockey program patch on it.

      “What level hockey do you play?” she asked.

      “Bantam house,” he said.

      And then she said the words we have become so accustomed to hearing in this hockey-loving city we call home: “Oh, just house? My son played travel.”

      Yes, my son plays “just house.”

      House hockey is the lowest level of youth hockey a kid can play. It’s traditionally less competitive, cheaper and less demanding (schedule wise) than its big, more popular, brother “travel hockey.”

      Many kids start out playing “house” and then transition to travel, but some do not. Yes, there are those who never leave the house level because their skills never develop enough for travel play, but that’s not usually the case.

      Most of the families we’ve met during my son’s nine years of house hockey are there by choice. Their sons and daughters are “good enough” for travel, but travel isn’t the right fit for their family.

      “From passion to commitment, there is nothing “just” about him or any of his house hockey coaches or teammates.”

      For some families, travel hockey is not an option financially (travel hockey is significantly more expensive - often by one or two thousand dollars). For other families, parent work schedules make travel hockey’s intense practice, game and out-of-town (sometimes even out-of-country) tournament schedules impossible.

      And for other families, like mine, having another child with special needs means the best we can give our hockey player - from a time and commitment standpoint - is house.

      For our family, the demands of house hockey (practice at least two nights a week and games on the weekends) is even too much at times, but we make it work because hockey is our son’s passion.

      Yes, hockey is our house player’s passion.

      From passion to commitment, there is nothing “just” about him or any of his house hockey coaches or teammates.

      These kids love hockey just as much as the travel kids in their leagues. In some cases, I would venture to say they love it even more. My son is regularly mocked and told he “sucks” by a travel hockey player at his middle school for playing “just house,” but he doesn’t care. His love for the game overcomes all.

      My son has house hockey teammates who, without a doubt, are good enough to make their high school’s varsity teams. Will they ever make the NHL coming from a house level? Odds are no, but so are the odds for a travel player.

      My fellow hockey parents at the house level sit in the same rinks as the travel hockey parents.

      We can tell you the coldest rinks in the region, where every Tim Horton’s in an hour radius is located and tie skates with our eyes closed.

      Our SUVs also smell like a locker room and we have just as much pride in our sons and daughters when they’re named MVP of a game as travel parents do. Like travel hockey families, hockey is a huge part of our lives and our teams become our extended families and best friends too.

      The coaches who coach house hockey are just as committed to their players and the game as travel coaches.

      They must re-arrange work schedules to make their hockey schedules work, spend their precious downtime writing drills and reviewing tape, and handle the same issues in a locker room that travel coaches do (yes, house kids get angry or sullen when they don’t perform at their best level too).

      Teenage house hockey players have the same crazy hormones teenage travel hockey players have, and those hormones belong to the coach many hours a week.

      If I had one wish for my hockey player when he grows up, it would be that he always continues to always love the game.

      I hope he always remembers his years at the rink with fondness and pride and that if anyone ever asks him if he played travel or house as a kid he replies: “I played hockey.”

      8U Q-and-A: Transitioning from 8U to 10U

      By By Joe Bonnett, reprint from USA Hockey ADM Online 03/13/2019, 12:45pm EDT

      Original Source Link

      Q. My child is finishing their 8U half-ice season and headed to 10U hockey in the fall.  How will the transition to full ice go? 

      A. This is a great question. There is no doubt that there will be an adjustment period for your child.  It will be important to stay patient and try to understand the changes that your player will be experiencing.

      First of all, hopefully your child will continue to participate in an ADM program that offers age- appropriate training to your players. Some of these 10U ADM recommendations may be proper off-ice training, station-based practices and small team sizes.  This is important because you want to continue to build on the development that your child received while in the 8U program. 

      The initial transition to station-based practices and small-area games at 10U will be seamless. However, full-ice games will take some adjustment time for your child. Patience on your end will be required.  Do not worry about line changes and ‘off-sides.’ The players will pick this up quickly as the season progresses. Initially players may tend to group together and not spread out. This makes sense because so far you player has been encouraged to be around the puck and support the puck during their half-ice experience. Over time, and with good coaching, the players will learn to spread out, play position and use the new space of the ice.

      More importantly, as your 10U player trains in station-based practice and small areas, they will acquire skill and hockey IQ at a greater rate than their counterparts who do not train with ADM recommendations. As your child progresses through 10U you will see their comfort continue to increase in handling the puck, skating with the puck, playing in traffic, passing and competing. These skills will outweigh your opponents in time and lead to success on the full-ice sheet. 

      In the end, be ready for awesome growth of your player and be patient on the adjustment to the full-ice sheet. 

      MITE Hockey 101: Part 2

      For those that missed MITE Hockey 101 part 1 earlier this year here is the link and sums up what it is like to play mite hockey (https://youtu.be/cXhxNq59pWg)

       

      MITE Hockey 101 Part 2 gets even better:

       

      This Dad Put a Mic on His 4-Year-Old at Hockey Practice, and It Is Outrageously Cute

       

      February 25, 2019

      by KARENNA MEREDITH First Published: February 23, 2019

      Ever wonder what your kid is thinking when they're muttering to themselves in the middle of a sports game? Sure, you get to hear their thoughts almost every second of each day, but what are they saying when you're not listening? Well, Twitter user @howtohockey, or "Coach Jeremy," got the inside scoop by putting a mic on his 4-year-old son Mason at hockey practice. Turns out, little kids just want McDonald's, to play with their friends, and to take some breaks. Same, Mason, same.

      Watch the full video above, and chuckle along with every adorable Mason quote. My personal favorite? "I'm gonna have a nap!"

      The video can be found here (https://youtu.be/A3-L3YwU-iQ) and is also at our organization home page.  Enjoy!

       

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      Blue Line Spring Development 2019

      March 24 - May 12, 2019

      Registration ends March 22, 2019

      Blue Line Player & Goalie Summer Camp

      July 15-18, 2019

      Registration ends July 5, 2019

      For more information visit the Blue Line Hockey School (handout, schedule, registration form, etc) visit their site:

      http://iceplex.morrisville.edu/blueline

      A Message to Hockey Coaches & Parents from Don Koharski


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